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Janis Joplin's Greatest Hits

Janis Joplin

H2O

Daryl Hall & John Oates

The Carving of Mount Rushmore

Rex Alan Smith

Red Moon Rising

Matthew Brzezinski

Complete Vampire Chronicles

Anne Rice

Bull Durham

Starring Tim Robbins, Susan Sarandon and Kevin Costner, and directed by Ron Shelton

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Dance, Dance, Dance: The Best of Chic

Chic

Storm Front

Billy Joel

A Charlie Brown Christmas

Charles M. Shultz and Bill Melendez

Scarface (1983)

Starring Al Pacino, Steven Bauer and Michelle Pfeiffer, and directed by Brian De Palma

Life Could Be Verse: Reflections on Love, Loss, and What Really Matters

Kirk Douglas

Being John Malkovich

Starring John Cusack, Cameron Diaz, Ned Bellamy and John Malkovich, and directed by Spike Jonze

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The Very Best of Spinners

Spinners

Whitney: The Greatest Hits

Whitney Houston

Jet Age: The Comet, the 707, and the Race to Shrink the World

Sam Howe Verhovek

St. Elsewhere, Season 1

Starring Ed Flanders, Denzel Washington and Howie Mandel

The Terminator

Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Biehn, Linda Hamilton, and directed by James Cameron

Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Starring Charles Fleischer, Stubby Kaye and Bob Hoskins, and directed by Robert Zemeckis

The Princess Bride

Starring Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon, Robin Wright and directed by Rob Reiner

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Janis Joplin's Greatest Hits

Janis Joplin

Queen: Greatest Hits

Queen

The Carving of Mount Rushmore

Rex Alan Smith

Red Moon Rising: Sputnik and the Hidden Rivalries that Ignited the Space Age

Matthew Brzezinski

Complete Vampire Chronicles

Anne Rice

Bull Durham

Starring Tim Robbins, Susan Sarandon and Kevin Costner, and directed by Ron Shelton

History Highlights

1835 – Mounting tensions between Mexico and Texas lead to violence when Mexican soldiers attempt to disarm the people of Gonzales, sparking the Texan war for independence. The battle flag used by the Texans at the Battle of Gonzales gained recognition as the “Come and Take It” flag, referring to a small cannon that Mexican forces tried to repossess.

1919 – President Woodrow Wilson, who had just cut short a cross-country speaking tour to promote formation of the League of Nations (a precursor to the United Nations), suffers a massive stroke, which leaves him partially paralyzed on the left side of his body. The stroke is kept a secret from the public, but forces Wilson to abandon his campaign for the League and weakens his presidency.

1950 – The first Peanuts comic strip, created by Charles Schulz, is published in seven newspapers across the U.S. Schulz originally called his strip “L’il Folks,” but United Features Syndicate changed the name.

1959 – “The Twilight Zone,” created and hosted by Rod Serling, premieres with an episode called “Where Is Everybody?” starring Earl Holliman. The black & white sci-fi series runs for five seasons.

1967 – Thurgood Marshall, the first African American U.S. Supreme Court justice, is sworn in to office.

1985 – Actor Rock Hudson becomes the first high-profile celebrity to die of complications from AIDS. Hudson’s death, at the age of 59, raises public awareness of the epidemic, which until that time had been ignored by many in the mainstream as a “gay plague.”

2006 – A 32-year-old milk truck driver enters the West Nickel Mines Amish School in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, and fatally shoots five female students and wounds five more before taking his own life. The gunman, Charles Carl Roberts IV, had no criminal history or record of mental illness.

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Every Picture Tells a Story

Rod Stewart

American Fool

John Cougar (Mellencamp)

The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation

Charles Solomon

The Twilight Zone Encyclopedia

Steven Rubin

American Pie

Don McLean

Fields of Gold: The Best of Sting 1984-1994

Sting

History Highlights

1865 – Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, land at Galveston, Texas with news that the war has ended and that the enslaved were now free. This was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, which became official on January 1, 1863. June 19 is observed around the U.S. as Juneteenth.

1905 – The world’s first nickelodeon opens in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and draws some 450 guests. The storefront theater boasted 96 seats and charged each patron a nickel.

1934 – Congress establishes the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to regulate broadcasting in the United States.

1953 –  Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviets, die in the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison in New York. Both deny wrongdoing and proclaim their innocence right up to the time of their execution. The Rosenbergs were the first American civilians executed for espionage during the Cold War.

1973 – In separate games, Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds and Willie Davis of the L.A. Dodgers achieve their 2,000th career hits.

1978 – Cartoonist Jim Davis introduces readers of 41 newspapers around the U.S. to a pleasantly plump, lazy, lasagna-loving cat named Garfield.

1981 – A caped superhero returns to U.S. movie theaters with the release of “Superman II,” starring Christopher Reeve as “The Man of Steel.”

2013 –  Actor James Gandolfini, best known for his role as crime boss Tony Soprano in the HBO series “The Sopranos,” dies of a heart attack at age 51 while vacationing in Italy. 

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Essential Collection

The Four Tops

Tapestry

Carole King

Garfield At Large

Jim Davis

The Sopranos: The Complete Series

Starring James Gandolfini, Edie Falco, Lorraine Bracco and Michael Imperioli, and directed by John Patterson and Timothy Van Patten 

The Notebook

Starring Ryan Gossling, Rachel McAdams, James Garner and Gena Rowlands, and directed by Nick Cassavetes

The War of the Roses

Starring Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner and Danny DeVito, and directed by Danny DeVito