History Highlights

1854 – Originally established as The Ashmun Institute, Lincoln University receives its charter from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, becoming the first degree-granting college in the U.S. founded solely for African-American students.

1945 – U.S. military forces liberate the Dachau concentration camp in Nazi Germany.  More than 188,000 prisoners were incarcerated in Dachau between 1933 and 1945, and more than 28,000 died in the camp and its sub-camps.

1974 – President Richard Nixon announces that he will release edited transcripts of taped White House conversations in response to a subpoena in the Watergate scandal. The House Judiciary committee insists that he also turn over the tapes. 

1986 – Pitching for the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park, Roger Clemens sets a Major League Baseball record with 20 strikeouts in nine innings against the Seattle Mariners.

1992 – Riots erupt across Los Angeles after four LAPD officers are acquitted in the beating of unarmed African American motorist Rodney King. Protesters in south-central L.A. block freeway traffic, wreck and loot shops and set more than 100 fires. The rioting continues for five days, and the event sparks a national conversation about racial and economic disparity and police use of force — a debate that still rages today.

2004 – The National World War II Memorial opens in Washington, D.C. It honors the 16 million people who served as part of the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II, including more than 400,000 who gave the ultimate sacrifice for their country. 

2011 –  Great Britain’s Prince William marries his longtime girlfriend, Catherine “Kate” Middleton, at Westminster Abbey in London. An estimated two billion people around the world watch the ceremony on television.

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The Essential Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington

Saturday Night Fever (The Original Movie Sound Track)

Bee Gees, Tavares, KC and the Sunshine Band, Yvonne Elliman and other artists

Where the Birds Never Sing: The True Story of the 92nd Signal Battalion and the Liberation of Dachau

Jack Sacco

Official Negligence : How Rodney King and the Riots Changed Los Angeles and the LAPD

Lou Cannon

16 Biggest Hits

Willie Nelson

Hairspray

Starring John Travolta, Michelle Pfeiffer and Christopher Walken, and directed by Adam Shankman

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The Platinum Collection (Greatest Hits I, II & III)

Queen

Supernatural

Carlos Santana

Polio: An American Story

David M. Oshinsky

The Rivalry: Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, and the Golden Age of Basketball

John Taylor

Easy Rider

Starring Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper and Karen Black, and directed by Dennis Hopper

Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow

Starring Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt and Bill Paxton, and directed by Doug Liman

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The Way We Were: Original Soundtrack

Barbra Streisand

Off The Wall

Michael Jackson

Groundhog Day

Don Yoder

Grand Central Terminal: 100 Years of a New York Landmark

Anthony W. Robins

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

James Joyce

Star Trek: The Next Generation (Season 1)

Starring Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, Levar Burton and Brent Spiner

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Blue Suede Shoes

Carl Perkins

All The Best: The Hits

Tina Turner

Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Jack E. Levin

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

Starring Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher and William Redfield, and directed by Milos Forman

Sleepless In Seattle

Starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, and directed by Nora Ephron

Contact

Starring Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey and James Woods, and directed by Robert Zemeckis

History Highlights

1835 – Mounting tensions between Mexico and Texas lead to violence when Mexican soldiers attempt to disarm the people of Gonzales, sparking the Texan war for independence. The battle flag used by the Texans at the Battle of Gonzales gained recognition as the “Come and Take It” flag, referring to a small cannon that Mexican forces tried to repossess.

1919 – President Woodrow Wilson, who had just cut short a cross-country speaking tour to promote formation of the League of Nations (a precursor to the United Nations), suffers a massive stroke, which leaves him partially paralyzed on the left side of his body. The stroke is kept a secret from the public, but forces Wilson to abandon his campaign for the League and weakens his presidency.

1950 – The first Peanuts comic strip, created by Charles Schulz, is published in seven newspapers across the U.S. Schulz originally called his strip “L’il Folks,” but United Features Syndicate changed the name.

1959 – “The Twilight Zone,” created and hosted by Rod Serling, premieres with an episode called “Where Is Everybody?” starring Earl Holliman. The black & white sci-fi series runs for five seasons.

1967 – Thurgood Marshall, the first African American U.S. Supreme Court justice, is sworn in to office.

1985 – Actor Rock Hudson becomes the first high-profile celebrity to die of complications from AIDS. Hudson’s death, at the age of 59, raises public awareness of the epidemic, which until that time had been ignored by many in the mainstream as a “gay plague.”

2006 – A 32-year-old milk truck driver enters the West Nickel Mines Amish School in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, and fatally shoots five female students and wounds five more before taking his own life. The gunman, Charles Carl Roberts IV, had no criminal history or record of mental illness.

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Every Picture Tells a Story

Rod Stewart

American Fool

John Cougar (Mellencamp)

The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation

Charles Solomon

The Twilight Zone Encyclopedia

Steven Rubin

American Pie

Don McLean

Fields of Gold: The Best of Sting 1984-1994

Sting

History Highlights

1865 – Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, land at Galveston, Texas with news that the war has ended and that the enslaved were now free. This was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, which became official on January 1, 1863. June 19 is observed around the U.S. as Juneteenth.

1905 – The world’s first nickelodeon opens in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and draws some 450 guests. The storefront theater boasted 96 seats and charged each patron a nickel.

1934 – Congress establishes the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to regulate broadcasting in the United States.

1953 –  Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviets, die in the electric chair at Sing Sing Prison in New York. Both deny wrongdoing and proclaim their innocence right up to the time of their execution. The Rosenbergs were the first American civilians executed for espionage during the Cold War.

1973 – In separate games, Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds and Willie Davis of the L.A. Dodgers achieve their 2,000th career hits.

1978 – Cartoonist Jim Davis introduces readers of 41 newspapers around the U.S. to a pleasantly plump, lazy, lasagna-loving cat named Garfield.

1981 – A caped superhero returns to U.S. movie theaters with the release of “Superman II,” starring Christopher Reeve as “The Man of Steel.”

2013 –  Actor James Gandolfini, best known for his role as crime boss Tony Soprano in the HBO series “The Sopranos,” dies of a heart attack at age 51 while vacationing in Italy. 

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Essential Collection

The Four Tops

Tapestry

Carole King

Garfield At Large

Jim Davis

The Sopranos: The Complete Series

Starring James Gandolfini, Edie Falco, Lorraine Bracco and Michael Imperioli, and directed by John Patterson and Timothy Van Patten 

The Notebook

Starring Ryan Gossling, Rachel McAdams, James Garner and Gena Rowlands, and directed by Nick Cassavetes

The War of the Roses

Starring Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner and Danny DeVito, and directed by Danny DeVito

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The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

The Ultimate Chi-Lites

The Chi-Lites

Golden Gate Bridge: History and Design of an Icon

Donald MacDonald and Ira Nadel

Bismarck: The Final Days of Germany’s Greatest Battleship

Niklas Zetterling

An Officer and a Gentleman

Starring Richard Gere, Debra Winger and Louis Gossett, Jr., and directed by Taylor Hackford

The Pit and the Pendulum

Starring John Kerr, Vincent Price and Barbara Steele, and directed by Roger Corman