History Highlights

1860 – The Pony Express launches, with horse and rider relay teams simultaneously leaving St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California as part of a new effort to speed up U.S. mail delivery. 

1948 – President Harry S. Truman signs the Economic Recovery Act of 1948 — later known as the Marshall Plan — which would foster the recovery of war-torn Europe. 

1968 – Stanley Kubrick’s science fiction classic, “2001: A Space Odyssey” — regularly voted as one of the greatest movies ever made, but whose philosophical meaning most fans cannot explain — opens in theaters around the U.S.

1968 – Another sci-fi classic opens at U.S. theaters. It’s “Planet of the Apes,” starring Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter and Maurice Evans. It’s the story about an astronaut crew that crash-lands on a planet in the distant future where intelligent talking apes rule and humans are oppressed and enslaved.

1974 – More than 140 tornadoes rip through 11 states within 16 hours. The “Super Tornado Outbreak” kills 330 people and injures more than 6,000 others.

1978 – At the 50th annual Academy Awards, Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall” wins the Oscar for Best Picture, beating out George Lucas’ “Star Wars.”

1986 – IBM unveils its first laptop computer. The 5140 “Convertible” retails for $1,995 and weighs 13 pounds.

1996 –  FBI agents arrest accused Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski at his rural Montana cabin. Kaczynski was linked to 16 mail bombs that killed three people and injured 23 others during an 18-year period.

Own a Piece of This Day

SHOP HERE:

The Definitive Collection

The Temptations

Queen of Bebop: The Musical Lives of Sarah Vaughan

Elaine M. Hayes

The Marshall Plan: Dawn of the Cold War

Benn Steil

2001: A Space Odyssey

Starring Douglas Rain, Frank Miller and Keir Dullea, and directed by Stanley Kubrick

On The Waterfront

Starring Marlon Brando, Karl Malden and Lee J. Cobb, and directed by Elia Kazan

Trading Places

Starring Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy and Denholm Elliott, and directed by John Landis

Own a Piece of This Day

SHOP HERE:

Oklahoma!

Starring Gordon Macrae, Gloria Grahame and Shirley Jones, and directed by Fred Zinnemann

Footloose

Starring Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer and John Lithgow, directed by Herbert Ross

Eiffel's Tower: The Thrilling Story Behind Paris's Beloved Monument and the Extraordinary World's Fair That Introduced It

Jill Jonnes

Raging Bull

Starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarty, and directed by Martin Scorsese

The Partridge Family: The Complete Series

Starring Shirley Jones and David Cassidy

Catch Me If You Can

Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks and Christopher Walken, and directed by Steven Spielberg

Own a Piece of This Day

Shop Here:

The Very Best of Spinners

Spinners

Whitney: The Greatest Hits

Whitney Houston

Jet Age: The Comet, the 707, and the Race to Shrink the World

Sam Howe Verhovek

St. Elsewhere, Season 1

Starring Ed Flanders, Denzel Washington and Howie Mandel

The Terminator

Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Biehn, Linda Hamilton, and directed by James Cameron

Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Starring Charles Fleischer, Stubby Kaye and Bob Hoskins, and directed by Robert Zemeckis

The Princess Bride

Starring Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon, Robin Wright and directed by Rob Reiner

Own a Piece of This Day

Shop Here:

Every Picture Tells a Story / Rod Stewart

Featuring his smash “Maggie May,” this is the album established Rod Stewart as a superstar who has enjoyed one of the longest careers in rock music. Stewart created his own sound — a mixture of folk, rock ‘n’ roll, blues and soul that sounded basically acoustic even when using electric guitars, bass and organ in the mix of acoustic instruments.

The Essential Aerosmith

Beginning with “Dream On,” Aerosmith’s ability to skillfully produce both ballads and rock music boosted their popularity during the ’70s, when they had a string of gold and platinum albums. After a lull throughout much of the ’80s, Aerosmith pulled off one of the most remarkable comebacks in rock history, returning to the top of the charts with a group of albums that equaled, if not surpassed, the popularity of their early albums.

The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation

This deluxe visual history treats Peanuts fans to an in-depth look at the art and making of the beloved animated Peanuts specials. From 1965’s original classic “A Charlie Brown Christmas” through the 2011 release of “Happiness is a Warm Blanket,” animation historian Charles Solomon goes behind the scenes of all 45 films, exploring the process of bringing a much-loved comic strip to life.

The Twilight Zone Encyclopedia

Noted film historian, producer and documentarian Steven Rubin has put together a rich, fact-filled “Twilight Zone” collectible, packed with vibrant history, amazing trivia and rare photographs — perfect for fans of Rod Serling’s brilliant series and anyone who appreciates vintage television.

American Pie / Don McLean

A long, winding elegy for rock and roll, Don McLean’s classic “American Pie” spent four weeks on the Billboard charts, but that smash success was eclipsed by its enduring afterlife in the culture, where it served as the fodder for nostalgia and parodies for decades, eventually earning entry into the National Recording Registry in 2017.

Fields of Gold: The Best of Sting 1984-1994

As a solo artist, Sting has carried himself with the grace of an aristocrat, retaining his air of dignity no matter what the musical setting. Jazz, blues, folk, and theater music influences have all helped to shape his post-Police sound. This album is a gathering of tracks from Sting’s first four solo albums.

Own a Piece of This Day

Shop Here:

The Best of The Monkees

A treasure trove for all Monkees fans, this collection packages the jangly guitars and mop-topped harmonies of “Last Train to Clarksville” and “Pleasant Valley Sunday,” the plaintive piano and Davy Jones’ wistful vocals on lovelorn ballad “Daydream Believer,” the woozy psychedelia of “Porpoise Song,” from the band’s trippy 1968 movie, “Head,” and much more.

Nevermind / Nirvana

Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” “Come As You Are,” “In Bloom,” “Lithium,” and “Breed” are corrosive anthems that ignited a movement, slammed shut a decade of excess, and catapulted the underground into the mainstream.

Warner Bros. Animation Art

Warner Bros made its archives available to researchers to trace the history of its most famous characters. This book traces the history of those characters and the artists that created them, telling the story of Warner Brothers, how the animation unit was established and how it grew.

King of the World

In charting Ali’s rise from the gyms of Louisville to his epochal fights against Liston and Floyd Patterson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author David Remnick creates a canvas of unparalleled richness. “King of the World” does justice to the speed, grace, courage, humor and ebullience of one of the greatest athletes and irresistibly dynamic personalities of our time.

Mrs. Doubtfire

The eccentric father (Robin Williams) of three children dresses as a British nanny so he can care for his children at the home of their unsuspecting mother (Sally Field) in this bright, heartwarming comedy directed by Chris Columbus.

The King's Speech

Winner of four Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Actor, “The King’s Speech” is based on the true story of King George VI’s quest to find his voice. Starring Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter.

History Highlights

1900 – A hurricane packing winds in excess of 130 miles per hour and a 15-foot storm surge slams into Galveston, Texas, devastating the island. About 8,000 people are killed, making the hurricane the deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history up to that time.

1921 – Sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C., is crowned the first Miss America at the end of a two-day pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 

1966 – A television sci-fi phenom is born with the premiere of “Star Trek” on NBC. The first episode is called “The Man Trap.” The series, consisting of 79 episodes over three seasons, stars William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, first officer and science officer aboard the starship USS Enterprise. In the decades since the original series ended, “Star Trek” has lived on through spin-offs, movies and conventions.

1974 – President Gerald Ford attempts to give closure to the Watergate scandal by granting his predecessor, Richard Nixon, a pardon for any crimes he may have committed or participated in while in office. 

1974 – Daredevil Evel Knievel survives a failed bid to leap the mile-wide chasm of the Snake River Canyon (Idaho) on his rocket-powered motorcycle.

1986 – “The Oprah Winfrey Show” debuts as the first talk show hosted by a black woman. 

1994 – US Air Flight 427 crashes on approach to Pittsburgh International Airport. All 132 people on board the Boeing 737 are killed. Investigators conclude the cause was a faulty rudder.

Own a Piece of This Day

Shop Here:

Let's Get It On / Marvin Gaye

Serving as Marvin Gaye’s first venture into the funk genre and romance-themed music, “Let’s Get It On” incorporates smooth soul, doo-wop and quiet storm. This remastered edition contains single versions of “Let’s Get It On” and “You Sure Love to Ball.”

Get The Knack / The Knack

The Knack emerged from a late ’70s musical landscape that was morphing from rock and disco to rock, punk and new wave. Here is the digitally re-mastered edition of the LA rock quartet’s 1979 debut album, featuring their smash “My Sharona.”

Isaac's Storm

Torqued by drama and taut with suspense, this absorbing narrative of the 1900 hurricane that inundated Galveston, Texas, conveys the sudden, cruel power of the deadliest natural disaster in American history. Told largely from the perspective of Isaac Cline, the senior U.S. Weather Bureau official in Galveston at the time, the story considers an era when “the hubris of men led them to believe they could disregard even nature itself.”

Evel: The High-Flying Life of Evel Knievel

New York Times best-selling author Leigh Montville (“The Big Bam”) takes on controversial daredevil Evel Knievel, revealing an intimate, often alarming, and ultimately sad portrait of a man who lived precariously, both on and off his motorcycle.

The Pink Panther

Meet Inspector Clouseau, the bumbling French detective whose career is one misstep after another. Showcasing the comedic genius of Peter Sellers, “The Pink Panther” is the sidesplitting film that launched one of the greatest comedy series of all time.

Sentimentally Yours / Patsy Cline

One of the greatest singers in the history of country music, Patsy Cline also helped blaze a trail for female singers to assert themselves as an integral part of the Nashville-dominated country music industry. This is one of the finest compilations of Cline’s work ever recorded, capturing her unique renditions of music representing a variety of genres.