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My Name is Barbra

Barbra Streisand

Parallel Lines

Blondie

The Greatest: My Own Story

Muhammad Ali

De Gaulle

Aidan Crawley

To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee

The Leno Wit: His Life and Humor

Bill Adler and Jay Walker

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Physical Graffiti (Remastered)

Led Zeppelin

The Wall

Pink Floyd

Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition

Daniel Okrent

Equal Means Equal: Why the Time for an Equal Rights Amendment Is Now

Jessica Neuwirth

West Side Story

Starring Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer and Russ Tamblyn, and directed by Jerome Robbins and Robert Wise

Walk The Line

Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Reese Witherspoon and Ginnifer Goodwin, and directed by Jim Wright and James Mangold

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Johnny Rivers: Greatest Hits

Johnny Rivers

Can't Slow Down

Lionel Richie

American Passage: The History of Ellis Island

Vincent J. Cannato

1983: Reagan, Andropov, and a World on the Brink

Taylor Downing

The Princess Bride

Starring Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon and Wallace Shawn, and directed by Rob Reiner

Brokeback Mountain

Starring Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal, Randy Quaid and Anne Hathaway, and directed by Ang Lee

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Tune In: The Beatles/All These Years

Mark Lewisohn

Bridge Over Troubled Water

Simon and Garfunkel

The Rolling Stone Interviews

Jann S. Wenner

The Berlin Wall: A World Divided, 1961-1989

Frederick Taylor

Introducing Dorothy Dandridge

Starring Halle Berry and Klaus Maria Brandauer

Stranger to the Game: The Autobiography of Bob Gibson

Bob Gibson

History Highlights

1912 – Democrat Woodrow Wilson is elected the 28th president of the United States in a landslide victory, defeating Republican incumbent William Howard Taft and Progressive Party candidate Theodore Roosevelt. It is the only presidential election in American history in which two former presidents were defeated by another candidate.

1940 –  Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelt is re-elected for an unprecedented third term as president of the United States. He is re-elected again in 1944, which paves the way for ratification of the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution in 1951, limiting all future presidents to two elected terms.

1968 – Republican Richard Nixon wins the presidential election, defeating Vice President Hubert Humphrey in one of the closest political races in U.S. history.

1968 – New York Democrat Shirley Chisholm becomes the first African-American woman elected to the U.S. Congress. She serves for 14 years.

1994 – Forty-five-year-old George Foreman knocks out 26-year-old Michael Moorer to become the oldest heavyweight champion in the history of boxing. More than 12,000 spectators at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas watch Foreman dethrone Moorer, who entered the fight with a 35-0 record.

2007 – A writers strike in New York and Los Angeles interrupts the production of more than 60 television shows and results in the loss of an estimated $3 billion to the LA economy alone. The walkout, by members of the Writers Guild of America (WGA), lasts more than three months.

2009 – Thirteen people are killed and more than 30 others are wounded, nearly all of them unarmed soldiers, when a U.S. Army officer goes on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood in central Texas. The deadly assault, carried out by Major Nidal Malik Hasan, an Army psychiatrist, becomes the worst mass murder at a U.S. military installation.

Celebrity Birthdays

1911 – American singer, cowboy and actor Roy Rogers, born Leonard Franklin Slye and known as the “King of the Cowboys” (d. 1998)

1913 – Actress Vivian Leigh (“Gone With the Wind,” “A Streetcar Named Desire”) (d. 1967)

1931 – R&B singer-songwriter Ike Turner who had a string of hits with then-wife Tina Turner (d. 2007)

1940 – Golden Globe-winning actress Elke Sommer (“The Prize,” “A Shot in the Dark,” “The Art of Love,” “The Oscar,” “Boy, Did I Get the Wrong Number”)

1941 – Singer-songwriter Art Garfunkel, formerly of the Grammy-winning rock-folk duo Simon & Garfunkel

1943 – Pulitzer Prize-winning actor and playwright Sam Shepard (“Days of Heaven,” “Paris, Texas,” “The Right Stuff,” “Country,” “Steel Magnolias”) (d. 2017)

1947 – Peter Noone, born Peter Blair Denis Bernard Noone, frontman for the 1960s British pop group Herman’s Hermits

1959 – Grammy-winning rock singer-songwriter Bryan Adams (“Cuts Like a Knife,” “Summer of ’69,” “(Everything I Do) I Do It for You”)

1960 – Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton (“Edward II,” “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe,” “Michael Clayton,” “Burn After Reading,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Doctor Strange”)

1963 – Oscar-winning actress Tatum O’Neal (“Paper Moon,” “The Bad News Bears,” “Nickelodeon,” “Little Darlings”)

1968 – Actor Sam Rockwell (“The Green Mile,” “Galaxy Quest” “Iron Man 2,” “Cowboys & Aliens,” “A Single Shot”)

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The Best of The Monkees

The Monkees

50 Big Ones: Greatest Hits

The Beach Boys

Unbought and Unbossed

Shirley Chisholm

God In My Corner: A Spiritual Memoir

George Foreman

Gone With The Wind

Starring Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh and Leslie Howard, and directed by Victor Fleming

Michael Clayton

Starring George Clooney, Tom Wilkinson and Tilda Swinton, and directed by Tony Gilroy

History Highlights

1792 – The cornerstone is laid for a presidential residence in the newly designated capital city of Washington. Eight years later, President John Adams becomes the first president to reside in the executive mansion, renamed the White House.

1943 – With World War II raging, the government of Italy declares war on Nazi Germany, its former Axis partner, and joins the battle on the side of the Allies.

1967 – The Anaheim Amigos lose to the Oakland Oaks, 134-129, in the inaugural game of the American Basketball Association (ABA). In its first season, the ABA consists of 11 teams. In 1976, the ABA merges with the National Basketball Association (NBA), with only four teams remaining intact: the Americans (later renamed the New Jersey Nets), the Spurs, the Nuggets and the Pacers. 

1974 – TV host Ed Sullivan, who introduced American viewers to Elvis Presley and The Beatles, among other up-and-coming entertainers, dies of cancer at the age of 73.

1977 – Four Palestinians hijack a Lufthansa passenger jet and demand the release of 11 imprisoned members of Germany’s Baader-Meinhof terrorist group, also known as the Red Army Faction.

1999 – A Colorado grand jury investigating the highly publicized case of murdered child beauty queen JonBenét Ramsey is dismissed, and the Boulder County district attorney announces no indictments will be made due to insufficient evidence.

2010 – Thirty-three miners are rescued after being trapped half a mile below ground for more than two months in a northern Chile mine collapse. The miners survive longer than anyone else trapped underground in recorded history. Their rescue is described in one media account as “a feat of engineering and a triumph of faith.”

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Off The Wall

Michael Jackson

The Woman in Red - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Stevie Wonder

The White House: The President's Home in Photographs and History

Betty C. Monkman

Impresario: The Life and Times of Ed Sullivan

James Maguire

Deep Down Dark

Héctor Tobar

The Essential Paul Simon

Paul Simon

Borat

Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and directed by Larry Charles

History Highlights

1789 – Congress passes and President George Washington signs the Judiciary Act of 1789 into law, establishing the Supreme Court of the United States as a tribunal comprised of six justices who were to serve until they voluntarily stepped down, retired or died. 

1941 – The Japanese consul in Hawaii is instructed to divide Pearl Harbor into five zones, calculate the number of battleships in each zone and report the findings back to Japan. Unbeknownst to U.S. military officials, this information is used to lay the groundwork for Japan’s devastating December 7, 1941 attack.

1957 – President Dwight Eisenhower orders federal troops to escort nine African American students, nicknamed the “Little Rock Nine,” into the previously all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. 

1968 – One of television’s longest-running news magazines debuts on CBS. It’s “60 Minutes,” with hosts Harry Reasoner and Mike Wallace presenting documentary-style coverage of the week’s news.

1969 – The trial of the “Chicago 8” begins. The band of protesters is accused of conspiracy and inciting a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. 

1977 – “The Love Boat” sets out on its maiden TV voyage on ABC, featuring a cruise ship full of celebrity passengers with tales of romance found and hearts broken. 

1988 – Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson runs the 100-meter dash in 9.79 seconds to win gold at the Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. However, Johnson tests positive for steroids three days later and is stripped of the medal, which is instead awarded to American Carl Lewis.

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1999

Prince

Nevermind (Remastered)

Nirvana

Warriors Don't Cry

Melba Pattillo Beals

Fifty Years of 60 Minutes

Jeff Fager

Jim Henson: The Biography

Brian Jay Jones

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

History Highlights

1813 – The United States gets its nickname, “Uncle Sam.” The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the U.S. Army during the War of 1812. Wilson stamped the barrels with “U.S.” for United States, but soldiers began referring to their rations as “Uncle Sam’s.”

1965 – Hurricane Betsy churns across extreme southern Florida en route to Louisiana where it kills 76 people and triggers widespread flooding. She’s the first hurricane to cause more than a billion dollars in damage, earning the nickname “Billion-Dollar Betsy.” 

1968 – Fifty women led by the New York Radical Women feminist group stages the first protest against the Miss America pageant. 

1977 – President Jimmy Carter signs a treaty granting Panama control over the Panama Canal beginning in the year 2000. The treaty ends an agreement signed in 1904 between then-President Theodore Roosevelt and Panama, which gave the U.S. the right to build the canal and a renewable lease to control five miles of land along either side of it.

1979 – The sports network ESPN debuts on cable TV. 

1980 – The 33rd annual Primetime Emmy Awards ceremony takes place, with statues going to the producers of “Taxi” and “Lou Grant” and performers Ed Asner and Barbara Bel Geddes — Asner for his starring role as newspaper editor Lou Grant, and Bel Geddes for her role as Miss Ellie, the Ewing family matriarch in the prime time soap “Dallas.” 

1986 – Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu becomes the first black man to lead the Anglican Church in South Africa. 

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The Real Buddy Holly Story

Hosted by Paul McCartney

Moon: The Life and Death of a Rock Legend

Tony Fletcher

Uncle Sam

Terry Allan Hicks

ESPN: The Uncensored History

Michael Freeman

The Simpsons: Season 1

Starring Albert Brooks, Maggie Roswell, Ron Taylor, Yeardley Smith and Harry Shearer

Across the Universe

Starring Evan Rachel WoodJim SturgessJoe Anderson, and directed by Julie Taymor

Musical Milestones

1963 – Allan Sherman releases his classic summer camp parody “Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah (A Letter From Camp).” Inspired by actual complaint letters that Sherman received from his son, Robert, while away at summer camp, the song climbs as high as No. 2 on the Billboard singles chart.

1968 – The Doors have the hottest single with “Hello, I Love You (Won’t You Tell Me Your Name).” It’s the band’s second chart-topper.

1971 – Paul McCartney announces the formation of his new band, Wings, featuring wife Linda and ex-Moody Blues member Denny Laine. 

1973 – Stevie Wonder releases “Innervisions,” playing virtually all the instruments on six of the album’s nine tracks.

1974 – “Annie’s Song,” by John Denver, begins its second and final week as a No. 1 single.

1985 – “Shout,” by Tears for Fears, begins three weeks on top of the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the duos’s second U.S. No. 1. 

1987 – Def Leppard releases “Hysteria,” which sells more than 25 million copies worldwide and becomes the band’s best-selling album to date. It spawns no less than seven hit singles, six of which make it to the Top 20.

1991 – “(Everything I Do) I Do It for You,” from the movie “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves,” keeps Bryan Adams on top of the Billboard Hot 100 for a second week. The track remains there for a total of seven weeks.

1996 – “Macarena,” by Los Del Rio, shimmies its way to the top of the Billboard pop chart and holds there for 14 weeks. Decades later, the song remains a favorite at wedding receptions, parties and sporting events.

2002 – Nelly burns up the Billboard Hot 100 with “Hot in Herre.” The track maintains a hold on the top spot for seven weeks.

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Hysteria

Def Leppard

The Very Best of The Doors

The Doors

Columbus: The Four Voyages, 1492-1504

Laurence Bergreen

The National Basketball League: A History, 1935-1949

Murry R. Nelson

The Classics

Tony Bennett

Trading Places

Starring Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche, and directed by John Landis

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Ultimate Dolly Parton

Dolly Parton

Rule The World: The Greatest Hits

Tears For Fears

Killing the Dream: James Earl Ray and the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Gerald Posner

Ghostbusters

Starring Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Sigourney Weaver, and directed by Ivan Reitman

The Music Man

Starring Robert Preston, Shirley Jones and Buddy Hackett, and directed by Morton DaCosta

The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty

Susan Page