History Highlights

1912 – With 27,000 people in the stands, the Boston Red Sox play their first game at Fenway Park and defeat the New York Highlanders (later renamed the Yankees) by a score of 7-6 in 11 innings. 

1916 – The first National League game played at Chicago’s Wrigley Field (then Weeghman Park) sees the Cubs beat the Cincinnati Reds 7-6 in 11 innings. A bear cub is in attendance at the ballpark, which becomes known as Cubs Park in 1920 after the Wrigley family purchases the team from Weeghman. It is named Wrigley Field in 1926 in honor of William Wrigley Jr., the club’s owner.

1971 – The U.S. Supreme Court upholds the practice of busing to desegregate schools, ruling in the case of Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education. Two years later, the high court makes a second ruling restricting the use of busing, concluding that students could only be bused across district lines if there was evidence that multiple districts had implemented deliberately discriminatory policies.

1977 – The comedy “Annie Hall” opens, starring director Woody Allen and Diane Keaton. The film goes on to win Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress and Best Original Screenplay.

1980 – The Castro regime announces that all Cubans wishing to emigrate to the U.S. are free to board boats at the port of Mariel west of Havana, launching the Mariel Boatlift.

1999 – The school day at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado is shattered by a massacre. Two seniors shoot 12 students and a teacher to death before taking their own lives. 

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Absolutely The Best!

The Chiffons

Yellow Submarine

Starring John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, and directed by George Dunning

Images of America: Fenway Park

David Hickey, Raymond Sinibaldi and Kerry Keene

Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation

Matthew F. Delmont

Hamp: The Legendary Decca Recordings

Lionel Hampton

Star Trek (The Original TV Series)

Starring William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley and George Takei, and produced by Desilu Productions

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The Essential Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley is king of the singles chart with “Don’t Be Cruel.” The song remains at No. 1 for 11 weeks.

Let's Get It On / Marvin Gaye

Let’s Get it On by Marvin Gaye returns to the top of the singles chart for a second week.

Charlie's Angels

“Charlie’s Angels” premieres on ABC with Kate Jackson, Jaclyn Smith and the late Farrah Fawcett as a trio of detectives working for their unseen boss, Charlie, who telephoned in their assignments.

A. Lincoln: A Biography

President Abraham Lincoln issues a preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which sets a date for the freedom of more than three million black slaves in the U.S. and recasts the Civil War as a fight against slavery.

Tommy Lasorda: My Way

Retired Los Angeles Dodgers manager and National Baseball Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda

Greatest Hits: Joan Jett & The Blackhearts

Rock guitarist-singer and 2015 Rock And Roll Hall of Fame inductee Joan Jett

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The Very Best Of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons

Hits like “Sherry,” “Let’s Hang On,” “Walk Like a Man,” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry” match the Four Seasons’ glorious vocalizing with unstoppable drum-driven rhythm tracks. Valli dives into the material with real sensitivity, connecting with the romantic pathos of “Dawn (Go Away),” “Rag Doll,” and similar tunes, animating each lyric with his trademark falsetto.

All The Best - The Hits / Tina Turner

Undeniably the most dynamic female soul singer in the history of music, Tina Turner has built a musical legacy — and this collection captures most of it, with beloved hits including “Proud Mary,” “What’s Love Got to Do With It,” “Private Dancer,” “We Don’t Need Another Hero,” and many more.

While the World Watched

In a highly personal account, author Carolyn McKinstry — a survivor of the horrific 1963 Ku Klux Klan bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama — offers the rare perspective of both a child and an eyewitness to some of the most jarring aspects of blacks’ fight for civil rights.

Sisters in Law

The author of the celebrated “Victory” tells the fascinating story of the intertwined lives of Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the first and second women to serve as U.S. Supreme Court justices.

The Fugitive

Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones race through the breathless manhunt movie based on the classic TV series. Ford is prison escapee Dr. Richard Kimble, a Chicago surgeon falsely convicted of killing his wife and determined to prove his innocence by leading his pursuers to the one-armed man who actually committed the crime.

And Then There Were None

From legendary mystery author and playwright Agatha Christie. Ten people, each with something to hide and something to fear, are invited to a isolated mansion on Indian Island by a host who, surprisingly, fails to appear. On the island they are cut off from everything but each other and the inescapable shadows of their own past lives. One by one, the guests share the darkest secrets of their wicked pasts. And one by one, they die…

Musical Milestones

1958 – The hottest single in the U.S. is “The Purple People Eater” by Sheb Wooley. The novelty hit holds the No. 1 spot for six weeks.

1962 – “I Can’t Stop Loving You,” by Ray Charles, is in its second week as a No. 1 single. It retains the top spot for five weeks.

1972 – Elvis Presley plays his first concert in New York City — the first of four sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden. The performances are recorded for later release on the “Elvis As Recorded at Madison Square Garden” album.

1972 – One month after auditioning for Columbia Records, Bruce Springsteen is signed by the label and begins assembling his E Street Band. His debut album, “Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.,” comes out in January 1973.

1979 – The Bee Gees reach No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the ninth time with “Love You Inside Out.” It becomes the sibling trio’s final chart-topper.

1984 – Cyndi Lauper begins a two-week run on top of the Billboard singles chart with “Time After Time,” off her debut album, “She’s So Unusual.” The track earns a Song of the Year Grammy nomination.

1990 – “Hold On,” by Wilson Phillips, clinches the top spot on the pop chart. The track goes on to win the Billboard Music Award for 1990 Hot 100 Single of the Year and is nominated for a Song of the Year Grammy.

1998 – The Ronettes (“Be My Baby,” “Walking In The Rain”) appear in court for their lawsuit against producer Phil Spector, whom they allege breached their 34-year-old contract by failing to pay royalties since 1963. Although The Ronettes win the case, the New York State Court of Appeals later overturns the decision, saying Spector had unconditional rights to their recordings.

2001 – Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Mýa and Pink have the No. 1 single with their cover of Labelle’s 1974 smash, “Lady Marmalade.”

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Timeless: The All Time Greatest Hits

Bee Gees

She's So Unusual

Cyndi Lauper

Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination

Neal Gabler

The Horse God Built: The Untold Story of Secretariat, the World's Greatest Racehorse

Lawrence Scanlan

Back to the Future

Starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson and Crispin Glover, and directed by Robert Zemeckis

iTunes

Starring Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder and Dianne Wiest, and directed by Tim Burton